Environment

How we cut our greenhouse gas emissions

Some answers to get you started

The only way to eliminate all GHG emissions is to stop farming. But as long as we produce eggs, our goal is to emit as little GHG emissions as possible:

  • Through our chicken feed
  • With solar panels
  • By drying chicken litter to fertilize land

Our reduction measures don’t stop here. The further optimization of our current reduction measures and the search for new reduction measures is a continuous process.

The remaining GHG emissions we offset through high quality credits from Climate Impact Partners. For this period, the project we supported was: Gyapa Cookstoves project in Ghana (Project ID 407, Protocol GS TPDDTEC v 2., Registry name: Gold Standard, Project type: avoidance/emission reduction). This project generates carbon credits by avoiding emissions from fuel use and deforestation in Ghana. The project is Gold Standard-certified – an international carbon standard endorsed by the International Carbon Reduction and Offset Alliance (ICROA) standards.

As a result of these emission reductions and offsets we are CarbonNeutral certified, verified by Climate Impact Partners.

We calculate our GHG emissions produced from cradle to customer. This includes everything from feed production, farm operations to chick raising and egg packaging and transport to the Kroger distribution centers. Our carbon footprint does not include storage and distribution of the egg after it has arrived at the Kroger distribution centers, nor use of the eggs by consumers. Our impact report is verified according to the ISO 14040/14044 standards by an independent third party (Blonk, a Mérieux NutriSciences Company). We calculate our GHG emissions in compliance with the Carbon Neutral Protocol from Climate Impact Partners.

Because we just started producing eggs in the United States, we have made a first estimate of our annual emissions based on our 2021 results of our farm operations in the Netherlands. After the first year of production in the U.S., we will run the actual numbers of the entire egg production process. We will compare that to the earlier estimates for our U.S. operations and offset the difference in emissions between our first estimates and the actual results, and the estimated emissions for the next year based on our first-year results.

By using up-cycled feed, green energy and sending our surplus solar energy to the grid the overall carbon footprint of the Kipster eggs is about 41% lower compared to using a conventional feed and grey energy.* We are continuously working to further lower our GHG emissions. For example, by searching for more sustainable feed ingredients and optimizing our barn’s energy efficiency.

*Based on the Dutch carbon footprint results of 2022, a conventional feed consisting of roughly 59% high quality grains, 28% by-products of crop production and processing and 13% other additives and a Dutch standard grey energy mix.

1. Chicken feed
Chicken feed is responsible for around 70% of the carbon footprint of an egg. Fertilizers, pesticides and ploughing of land all create GHG emissions. The cultivation, harvesting, transportation and processing of feed crops consume fossil fuel. Our feed has a footprint of close to 43% less than conventional feed.* By using up-cycled feed we bypass using agricultural land as much as possible.

*Based on the results of our Dutch carbon footprint calculations of 2022 and a conventional feed consisting of roughly 59% high quality grains, 28% by-products of crop production and processing and 13% other additives.

2. Solar power
We produce more electricity from our solar panels than we use, and deliver the surplus energy back to the grid. The surplus solar energy is used to offset a part of our greenhouse gas emissions by subtracting the avoided emissions from grey energy production. To do so, we do not sell the certificates of origin of our solar energy to avoid double counting. By doing this we are able to reduce more GHG emissions than our on-farm energy use emits.*

*Based on the results of our Dutch carbon footprint calculations of 2022 and a Dutch standard grey energy mix.

3. Chicken litter
Manure is responsible for about 8% of our carbon footprint.* The manure is dried and stored at the farm. Farmers can then use it to fertilize their lands. We take the greenhouse gas emissions during storage into account.

*Based on the results of our Dutch carbon footprint calculations of 2022.

The carbon footprint for Kipster eggs produced in the Netherlands in 2022:

  • Total eggs*: 2,670 ton CO2-equivalents

(This includes solar energy sent to the grid: 282 tons of CO2 equivalents)

  • Per egg: 0.114 kg CO2-equivalents

(After compensation with solar energy sent to the grid, CO2-neutral egg cartons)

  • Per kg of eggs: 1,94 kgCO2-equivalents

(After compensation with solar energy sent to the grid, CO2-neutral egg cartons)

Please see the Kipster Annual Report 2022 for more information about the breakdown of the carbon footprint for the Kipster eggs.

*Includes the breeding and rearing of hens and roosters.

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